The STUDYING in studying abroad

With my classes, and traveling I’ve been super busy these past couples of weeks and haven’t had time to sit down and write much, but I thought it would be good to tell you all about my classes because after all, I do STUDY abroad…

My friend Jared and I found this cute Bookstore-Coffee Shop -Caótica- where lots of studying is done, as you can see

I think when people think of studying abroad, they think of “easy A” classes, and classes in which professors are going to allow slack, but to my surprise, some of my classes here have actually been harder than I expected and wanted them to be. As I’ve written in past posts, my Cervantes class at the Universidad de Sevilla takes most of my time, and I always find myself reading something for that class (in between classes, after lunch, before dinner, in the planes, at the airports and bus stations), leaving me a little overwhelmed and questioning if I made the right choice challenging myself to take that class. One day as I walked into class, I heard some of the Spanish students complaining about the workload, and the expectations of our professor. Just like me, they were very overwhelmed by the amount of reading our professor was expecting us to do, but as they talked about it I realized that I was ahead in the readings than most of them, so I was in better shape than I thought I was… Now, even though I’m still a little overwhelmed by everything I have to do, I know that everyone is feeling the same way and that I’m keeping up just fine.

Along with my class the USEV, I’m really enjoying my classes at the center, there I am taking:

  • Psychology of learning a second language: SUPER interesting, and I feel like I can relate and learn a lot about myself in it since I learned English as my second language, and the way the brain works has always fascinated me. In this psychology class we learn all about the mental processes that children and adults go through when learning a second language, as well as all of the theories and studies that have been done through out the years.
  • Academic writing in Spanish: a one-day a week class in which we work on our Spanish writing skills, which is what I think I need to work the most on. 
  • Spanish Society: A sociology class which explores all aspects of Spanish society, from the modernization of Spain, to family relations to political issues, etc. 
  • Cultural realities of Spain: a class in which we explore many of the cultural issues that surround Spain, as well as cultural shocks we can encounter during our time abroad. 
  • Flamenco: This is the best class ever!! Here we learn how to dance “Sevillanas”, the typical flamenco dance in Sevilla (getting ready for feria), as well as learn about the history of flamenco. If you’re studying abroad in Sevilla I DEFINETELY recommend you take this class, because it truly is a once-in-a-lifetime experience!! Where else are you going to learn to dance flamenco, and then dance it at the BIGGEST party ever (Feria)??

UPDATE:
It’s been 2 weeks since I started drafting this post and today I finished the first volume of Don Quijote, one more to go!!! And although it was a hard read, I am so amazed by the intellect and creativity of Cervantes, not only is this book an amazing piece of literature but it goes so much deeper than all of the metaphors and allusions, it truly represents the essence of being human, and of living in a society that often conforms to the expectations that people years ago set in place for all… From talking about the importance of taking care of the environment to upholding the dignity of women, EVERYTHING is in those pages, and although it might take a long time to read I think everyone should read it.

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